- by Ulf Silfverström -

Environmental issues came strongly in the 1990s. For example, the freons in the dry cleaners were banned in 1994, and perlors were being penalized.

- Perklor cost SEK 10 / kg and in Norway a tax of SEK 50 / kg was introduced. We managed to stop the corresponding plans in Sweden. I do not know if all laundries have understood the significance of that decision, says Sten Jennervall, who chaired 17 intensive years, 1994-2011.

“Greenpeace had heard about a completely new American environmentally friendly dry cleaning method. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Swedish Chemicals Agency really turned this on. ”

A contributing reason for the wildest plans going for nothing was a trip to America. Sten Jennervall says:

- Greenpeace had heard about a completely new American environmentally friendly dry cleaning method. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Swedish Chemicals Agency really turned this on. It was called Greenclean. We got in touch and traveled to New York to study the method. It turned out that the method the Americans launched was a so-called "driving method", which meant that with a nozzle they only blew steam and air on the garments - so no washing at all.

ACTING PROACTIVELY

The Swedish Textile Service Association saw other opportunities. The union required members to leak, arranged courses and produced valuable key figures. The results did not wait.

- In the 1950s you immediately felt that there was a dry cleaning in the neighborhood. The effort we now made gave both better environment and economy.

BORN IN THE INDUSTRY

Sten Jennervall came from the dry cleaning side. He took over the 23-year-old family business in Östersund, founded in 1934, after his father. A few years later he expanded with industrial laundry and entrance rugs.

- Östersund is not a big industrial city. That is why I started a hotel laundry in 2003 and then we got a fantastic development. When I sold last year, sales had increased seven times.

FAST IN THE BOARD

Sten Jennervall joined the board after an initial member meeting in Falun.

- I couldn't keep quiet. Then I was asked for an assignment, so it started.
The contacts through all members have been valuable. While visiting around the country, tips and advice have emerged.

THE GREAT DECISION

Some major decisions made during the 17 years were the introduction of authorization checks for everyone. Previously, it had only applied to dry cleaners. An ambitious control program was now developed in collaboration with the Danish Technological Institute, DTI.

- We discussed a lot about what the authorization would stand for. Many occupational groups were authorized without anything behind. We produced a protocol that showed hygiene, working environment, yes in pretty much everything.

“In the 1950s you immediately felt that there was a dry cleaning in the neighborhood. The effort we now made gave both better environment and economy. "

IMPORTANT COOPERATION

- We started working with county council cleaners who had their own association and that we originally competed with. Instead, we got into a collaboration. We had many common issues and when we were merged it was a good solution.

The member magazine, which started in 1995, thought Sten Jennervall would die out after a few issues. But that did not happen. It went on until 2006.

Fair trips increased in frequency, especially to Frankfurt and Milan. Previously, some individual trips had been arranged, but now it became an established business.

A branch insurance was also introduced, which provided great member benefits.

- Smaller companies could earn the membership fee directly by taking out the insurance through the union.

ENERGY FOR THE ENERGY TAX

One issue that is still relevant is energy taxation. Why is there a lower energy tax on the production of paper napkins and higher when linen napkins are washed? The issue has been bumped and wet in all sorts of forums. Continuation will follow.

- The industry has changed a lot. In the 1950s / 60s we had about fifteen dry cleaners in Östersund, today there are two left. The laundry rooms in the residential buildings gave completely new washing patterns and the materials changed. This has been a challenge to work with, says Sten Jennervall, still strongly engaged but now outside the board.

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25% RUT deduction on laundry